What do I give my dog for fleas?

One of the problems we see at Newport Harbor Animal Hospital is: Fleas!

Questions inevitably follow the diagnosis of fleas – here are some of the questions that I have been asked over the years:
Q. Can I use garlic to prevent fleas?
A. NO! Garlic is toxic to dogs and cats but not to fleas! This food can cause dog and cat red blood cells to burst. So, don’t use it.
Q. Does motor oil kill fleas?
A. All petroleum distillates (oil products – motor oil, baby oil etc.) are dangerous to pets – just stay away.
Q. Can I use diatomaceous earth?
A. Diatomaceous earth may help to desiccate flea eggs to a minor extent but is not effective in killing fleas. This may be helpful in environmental control but not on your pet!
Q. Can I use ½ a dose or split the medication between my pets?
A. NO! The dose for your pet is the correct one based on their size. Improper administration may lead to inadequate protection.
Q. My pet doesn’t go outside – why do I need prevention?
A. Fleas don’t stop at your front door! And without blood they don’t survive so they hitch a ride with you into your pet’s lives. Wildlife such as squirrels, rabbits, opossums, raccoons all carry fleas. So, while you are sleeping these critters are visiting your house and leaving fleas to infest your pets.
Q. I have never seen a flea – my pet doesn’t have any!
A. I have heard this so many times I cannot count. And equally as often, when I pull out the flea comb I find fleas or their droppings. Fleas are parasites they’re job is to hide and eat to survive. So, just because you haven’t seen any fleas – doesn’t always mean they’re not there.
Q. I always get flea bites and I don’t have any, so therefore my pet doesn’t have any fleas right?
A. This is not the case. Fleas are parasites. They need a host to survive. The host they prefer is a dog or a cat. Once they are on the preferred host (your pet) they do not leave. Fleas that hatch in the environment and have not found your cat and dog to live on may find you to bite, but once they are on your pets they stay there, therefore you will not always get bit by fleas if your pet has them.

What do I give my dog or cat for fleas?

We are starting to see more fleas this time of year with the humidity and warmer weather. Southern California is a great environment for fleas – they never really go away, but we see an increase in the population at the perfect time: when everyone is out in the great weather to socialize. So, what do we do about these little parasites? Well, the key is prevention! Fleas carry yucky diseases like: tapeworm, Mycoplasma – a bacteria that attaches to red blood cells, and Bartonella – the bacteria that causes ‘cat scratch fever’, Yersinia pestis – the ‘black plague’ and Typhus. Fleas can also cause allergic reactions that make your pet itchy and can lead to skin infection (FAD: flea allergic dermatitis). All of these conditions can be prevented with appropriate flea prevention.

There are many, many options out on the market today. So many, that it’s difficult to know which one is the best for your individual pet. Not one is perfect for everyone! There are topical liquids that you place on your pet’s skin and oral pills. Some that last for 1 month and some that last for 3 months. In order to decide which is best for your pet you must consider:
1. Does your pet swim or bathe more than once per month?
2. Does your pet go into areas that ticks may be present?
3. Do you want to give it topically or orally?
4. How often do you want to give the medication?
5. Does your pet have any health concerns?
6. Is your dog pregnant?
So, what is the best flea medication for my dog or cat? At Newport Harbor Animal Hospital we have narrowed the options down to a few trusted medications:

Comfortis
– Pill
– Given once per month
– Kills and prevents fleas
– For Dogs and Cats

Bravecto
– Pill
– Given once every 3 months
– Kills and prevents fleas and ticks
– Dogs only

Revolution
– Topical liquid
– Applied once per month
– Includes flea prevention, heartworm prevention, (and some intestinal parasites in cats), tick prevention for the brown dog tick, ear mites, sarcoptic mange
– For Dogs and Cats (make sure you choose the correct version!)
– A heartworm test (simple blood test) is needed prior to starting on this medication.

Trifexis
– Contains the active ingredient in Comfortis
– Pill
– Given once per month
– Kills and prevents fleas
– Prevents heartworm and some intestinal parasites
– For Dogs
– A heartworm test (simple blood test) is needed prior to starting on this medication.

The bottom line is – fleas are gross and very preventable! When you bring your pet in to see us at Newport Harbor Animal Hospital, we will advise you on the best option for your pet – because one size does not fit all!

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Summertime Pet Hazards

summertime pet hazards

  • What are fox tails?
  • Barbeque Hazards.
    • Dripping from the grill.
    • Skewers
    • Corn on the cob
  • What do i do if my dog has heat stroke?

Click image for Pet Safety tips provided Newport Harbor Animal Hospital 949-631-2211

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Birth Announcement

We are very excited about the newest addition to the Newport Harbor Animal Hospital family:
birth-announcement

Dempsey Marie Ashbran was born May 5th.
She was 7lb 8 oz and 19.5 inches long. Mom, Dad and Dempsey are all doing well and home from the hospital.

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Holiday Pet Hazards: Easter is around the corner and brings many dangers for dogs and cats!

Easter Holiday Pet Hazards

  • Are lily’s toxic to cats or dogs?
  • Is chocolate toxic to my dog or cat?
  • My cat/dog ate Easter grass!

Our mission at Newport Harbor Animal Hospital is: “To provide the highest quality veterinary care for our patients and the best service for our clients. Our goal in every case is a healthy pet and a happy client.”

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Retirement Announcement

To our Loyal Newport Harbor Family,

We are happy to announce the ‘passing of the baton’ from Dr. Carpenter and Dr. Millian as they begin their hard earned retirements! Dr. Ashbran and Dr. Wind have been personally selected and nhah-home-retiringgroomed as successors to uphold the high standard of care – in both medicine and customer service – for which Newport Harbor Animal Hospital is well known. Both Dr. Carpenter and Dr. Millian have asked for no fan fair or mailings be made as they prefer to ‘ride off into the sunset’. We would like to thank them for their years of hard work and contribution to veterinary medicine making Newport Harbor Animal Hospital the great place that it is. All of the doctors and staff remain unchanged and were hand-picked by Dr. Carpenter and Dr. Millian. Newport Harbor Animal Hospital continues with the same philosophy in taking the best care of you and your pets. Please call us any time!

Sincerely,
Newport Harbor Animal Hospital

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Annual Pet Costume Event Oct 30th 2015

pet costume event

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Why does my pet have bad breath?

Something we all love is to hug our dog and cat and even give them a little kiss. During their lives at some point this becomes more challenging due to bad breath. Bad breath is most often caused by some level of dental disease.

Why does my pet have bad breath

Pet Dental Special for the month of February 2015 only. CALL US TODAY! (949)-631-2211

Think of how white and shiny the teeth were when you were raising your puppy or kitten.

Sadly the teeth don’t remain in this condition. There are many things to look at when we do and exam of the mouth. Tartar and inflammation of the gum, called gingivitis might be noticed at home. All of the issues related to bad breath and dental disease will be discussed in this article. Dental care is very important to your dog and cat.

Bad Breath

Bad breath may be related to a lot of issues. In the simplest cases it may be related to the food.
Any time you notice a change from normal it is a good idea to have your cat or dog’s mouth examined. This is a normal part of our physical exam but is important to understand the mouth can’t be completely examined without anesthesia and full mouth dental X-rays. Naturally, everyone is used to these X-rays for their own dental care. The good news is that our doctors can tell you when it is necessary to do a full exam, X-rays and cleaning under anesthesia.

Teeth

Dogs have 42 teeth and cats have 30. If there are retained baby teeth it creates a natural crowding that makes it more likely to have diseases of the gums and the tissue that holds the teeth (more on this later).

Tartar and Plaque

If the teeth don’t appear white to you it is likely there is plaque and or tartar present. They will appear to be dark yellow or brown.
Plaque is a gummy substance that is formed by bacteria as the feed off the food that is stuck to the teeth. When plaque matures it gets very hard. This is tartar. When tartar builds up your dog or cat feels like we do when we have a piece of popcorn stuck in our teeth. If either plaque or tartar are present it is time to have the teeth seen by one of our doctors. We will work with you to make a plan.

Orastrips

One of the tools we have during the exam of your cat or dog is a little strip called Orastrips.
These strips measure a chemical called Thiol. This chemical is produced by bacteria that live in the absence of oxygen. This is important because it an indicator of periodontal disease which we will discuss in a bit. These strips help us to predict how serious the problem are with your dog or cat.

Gingivitis

Gingivitis is inflammation of the gums. Gingivitis can certainly cause pain. The good news is that if gingivitis is present without periodontal disease it will be reversible with treatment. Gingivitis is caused by infection and will appear as reddening that starts at the margin of the gum and tooth.

Periodontal Disease

Periodontal disease is a condition where the tissue that holds the teeth is being damaged. We have all heard this term. This is one of the main reasons X-rays are important as we work on the mouth. X-rays are the most accurate way for us to see how much damage is present. From there we can determine the best treatment. Periodontal disease is an infection. Periodontal disease is painful. Left unchecked it will cause the loss of teeth and may result in infections deep in the body. These infections can reach the valves of the heart, the joints, kidneys and other internal organs.
Treatment includes deep cleaning under the damaged areas and local antibiotic treatment to the area. We will also use oral antibiotics. If the dental X-rays show too much damage the tooth may need to be extracted. All of our extractions here at Newport Harbor are surgical so the tooth can be removed with the least amount trauma. We treat the pain before during and after the extraction. Many of these dogs and cats have been in pain for some time and they feel better immediately after the extraction.

Tumors

On occasion we will find cancer in the mouth of a dog or cat. These patients often have the worst smelling breath. The tumors are often infected as well which adds to the pain and discomfort. The earlier we find these the better.

If you have any of the indications of dental disease or a change in your dog or cat’s breath please call us.
Our American Animal Hospital Association accredited hospital is here to help. You are an important part of our team as we take care of your pet for a healthy happy lifetime.

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Now scheduling surgery and dental procedures on Saturdays.

To better serve your pets and add to your convenience Newport Harbor Animal Hospital is now scheduling surgery and dental procedures on Saturdays. Starting January 4th our highly trained doctors and technicians will be available for anesthetic procedures. Don’t hesitate to call us to schedule procedures. The check-in time for surgery and dental appointments on Saturdays is from 7:30 to 8:00 am.

Newport Harbor Animal Hospital Phone: (949) 631-2211 Providing state of the art veterinary care services throughout Orange County, Costa Mesa, Newport Coast, Irvine and Laguna Beach. If your coming from Highway 73 “We will pay all your toll road fees”.

Orange County Pet Dental and Surgery Care

State of the Art Pet Dental and Surgery Care

 

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Orange County Pet Dentistry Services

Care of your pet’s teeth is a lifetime commitment. It is our commitment as well. Over the course of the last several decades, pet’s lifespan is increasing. Dental care is a big part of this increase.

As an American Animal Hospital Association accredited hospital, we follow the AAHA Pet Dental Care Guidelines. In these guidelines it is stated that pet dental care, for your pet, is essential to provide optimum pet health and quality of life. We all have examples of oral pain and how miserable it can make us. The same is true of our pets.

Our staff will teach you and talk to you about home care. We would much rather work on prevention as opposed to treatment.

If you have any veterinary pet dental questions, please be sure to ask our knowledgeable staff. Phone: 949-631-2211

Orange County Pet Dentistry Services

Orange County Pet Dentistry Services

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Most Common Medical Problems in Cats

Cats are very good at hiding illnesses from you so you might wonder what the most common medical problems we see in cats at our Newport beach cat hospital.

As you read along you will see what occurs most frequently in our feline patients with some important information to help you take care of your kitty. If you would like more details on any of these subjects you can look in our literature section or give us a call.

10 Most Common Conditions from VPI Pet Insurance

1. Bladder infection

2. Chronic kidney disease

3. Hyperthyroidism

4. Upset stomach

5. Dental disease

6. Diabetes

7. Diarrhea

8. Ear infection

9. Skin allergies

10. Lymphosarcoma

In our cat literature section you will find a detailed descriptions to each of the top 10 common cat medical concerns listed above.

newport beach cat clinic

Loving cat care since 1947

Our AAHA accredited hospital and staff are always here to answer questions and work as a team with you and your cat. Our goal in every case is a healthy pet and a happy client.

Call or come by and see us!

Newport Harbor Animal Hospital 125 Mesa Drive, Costa Mesa, CA 92627

Phone: 949-631-2211 / FAX: 949-631-3354.

 

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